EARTHQUAKE IN NEPAL, 27 April 2015

On Saturday, a few minutes before noon, a massive earthquake struck Nepal.  The epicenter of the quake, which registered 7.8 on the Richter Scale, was approximately halfway between Kathmandu and the town of Pokhara in central Nepal. Deaths and destruction have been reported from as far away as Tibet, Bangladesh, north India and Bhutan, but the major damage has been here in Nepal. 39 of Nepal’s 75 districts have been seriously affected and more than 3000 deaths and 6000 serious injuries have been tabulated. 


The total number of casualties is sure to be much higher. Nepal’s underdeveloped communications system, and lack of government coordination, is such that many deaths will never be reported. On Sunday, at about 1 PM an after-shock registering 6.6 shook the country again. Significant tremors occurred again at 4.20 AM this morning, Monday. 


Although the government has intensified the rescue efforts in and around Kathmandu, lack of equipment and accessibility has made the rescue operations slow. Hundreds of people are feared to be still trapped inside the rubble and debris of the collapsed buildings in the capital. Many historical buildings have been reduced to dust. Reports received so far suggest that many villages perched on mountainsides are devastated or struggling to cope. 


The earthquake has spread horror from Kathmandu to small villages and to the slopes of Mount Everest, triggering an avalanche that buried part of the base camp packed with foreign climbers preparing to make their summit attempts. At least 18 people died there and 61 were injured.


In the capital, the government has announced free treatment to the victims. But the hospitals are overcrowded and many are not in a position to offer treatment. The people are still in shock as the aftershocks continue. Most of the people are staying out in the open places as they fear to go back to their partially damaged houses. 


The main highways in and out of Kathmandu are blocked due to the landslides caused by the earthquake.  This has hindered rescue teams that tried to use mountain trails to reach those in need. 


At the moment the help is being rendered rather in a random manner than organized. The local communities and all those who are not affected by the quake are involved in rescue operations. Nepal Jesuit Society has responded quickly to this terrible tragedy. St. Xavier’s College has reached out to two remote villages in Dhading district providing the villagers with tarpaulin sheets to sleep under and basic food material. There is another relief material distribution under way in Kavre district. Many roads are blocked and so it is hard to reach by road in many places. We hope to reach out to some more villages where relief work has not been done so far. For this we count on your help and prayers.


The media has broadcast dramatic images of the massive destruction to the Kathmandu Valley’s temples and religious monuments.  It is true that a number of historic sites have been reduced to piles of rubble, along with many of the city’s traditional brick and tile homes.  A large neighborhood near the Swayambhunath stupa has been wiped out, and the bridge connecting them to the city center has collapsed.


The damage to more recently-built reinforced concrete structures, though less obvious, is also significant.  Consequently, many people are terrified of sleeping in their homes and have erected tents and make-shift shelters in open areas for the past two nights.  Throughout the night one can see people simply walking the streets, or huddled under blankets by the side of the road, for lack of shelter. Unseasonal rain has sent night-time temperatures plummeting, adding to the misery of those displaced.

Much media attention has been given to the avalanches at Everest base camp because well-equipped foreigners are able to send news via social media; but it is the rural poor in districts around the epicenter who are suffering more profoundly. The destruction of homes in outlying villages has been even more catastrophic than those places appearing in the news.

Schools were declared closed for five days; and most shops, businesses and offices have not re-opened. It is unclear how badly the food supply chain to Kathmandu has been disrupted. Prices for vegetable and staples have already sky-rocketed. Phone service and electricity in the heart of Kathmandu Valley have gradually become more available, after a complete cut-off on Saturday. The service is very intermittent.. Fortunately, the 3G / broadband internet in the capital area has remained open since the quake, allowing some communication to the outside world via the internet.

One great concern now is water supply and food. As stored food and water supplies diminish, suffering will increase. In addition to providing medical care to those who were severely injured, medical teams are concerned about the possible outbreak of diseases, especially cholera, because of damage to the water supply system.

Kathmandu’s small airport is strained to the limit as planes carrying emergency supplies and relief workers arrive. Meanwhile many commercial flights continue to operate in order to evacuate large numbers of tourists and trekkers. Local and international search-and-rescue teams continue to dig through the remains of collapsed houses, both here in Kathmandu, and in rural areas, hoping to find survivors before the ominous 72-hour mark passes.  At this writing, they have less than 20 hours before that deadline.

Once the immediate rescue operations are completed, and emergency first aid is provided for the most seriously-injured, major recovery efforts will continue for those who have been made homeless, been disabled, or lost  their livestock and other means of livelihood. It is critical that those in heavily affected villages, and not subject to the media spotlight, be helped.

The Jesuits of Nepal, along with other religious communities and the Vicariate of Nepal, are fortunate in that we suffered no loss of life or serious injury.  There has been some damage to buildings at our institutions. When the risk of after-shocks has passed we will assess the situation more closely, in order to assure the safety of those we teach and serve.

St. Xavier’s schools and college and St. Mary’s school have opened its compound for anyone who wants shelter.

The prayerful support, and material assistance of our brother Jesuits and their colleagues, the wider church, and of the general public, will be of enormous help to us as we provide aid to those in immediate dire need, and begin to help Nepal recover from the devastating impact of the earthquake.

Our core team meets tomorrow morning at 8 am to plan out the mechanism with email ID/Phone to carry out the work and then I will send you the other details. Definitely, we need more financial help when it comes to the rehabilitation phase.  We hope to select a few areas that are most affected.

Thanks for your prayers,

Fr. Boniface Tigga, SJ
Regional Superior, Nepal Region

Evangelization, March 2014

For Evangelization: That many young people may accept the Lord’s invitation to consecrate their lives to proclaiming the Gospel. March

Last October a good friend pronounced his final vows; a huge step for a Jesuit!  We pronounce perpetual vows after the two year noviciate program, but only after long training and successful ministry does the Society of Jesus make its final commitment to its members.  That took him twenty years!  At his reflections during the vow ceremony Mass, he confessed that he first came north “. . . to see Nepal!”  After ten years of schooling at home, he had spent two years in a minor seminary in south India before travelling north to enjoy his visit.  After a year in our “pre-noviciate” program, his motives had changed.  He accepted our invitation to join the noviciate at Kalimpong, pronounced those first perpetual vows two years later, continued studies and service, was ordained, and finally reached that happy October day.

Before we can proclaim the Gospel we absorb it into our own lives.  This good news boils down to the Law of Love, that is, Jesus’ words to his disciples:  “Love one another as I have loved you.” (John 15:12)  I define love as the will to work for the best for myself and all who enter my life.  I try to challenge myself first, and then everyone I meet, to live up to Jesus’ law.  Most people in our world are not Christian, but can still be the loving people I believe God is calling them to be.  I certainly do not like everyone in the same way or to the same extent, but try to see God’s created goodness in them, and therefore I want them to get the most out of this life and reach eternal life.  I try to teach them by example, always forgiving and challenging them to forgive, and therefore to enjoy the freedom of being people without enemies.

To love fully in this way is to let go of selfishness.  I cannot say I will love someone only so much, and no more.  Any limit reveals a lack of love.  St. Paul reminds us that Jesus emptied himself on the cross in order to personally enjoy the Resurrection himself, and to offer that enjoyment to the world. (Philippians 2:6-11)  None of us has reached this level of love, but hopefully we are patiently yet persistently moving towards higher levels of love, and enjoying that movement.

My friend who pronounced his vows in October is from a good family.  His parents and relatives were his first teachers of the art of loving.  Having given him a good education, they gave him the freedom to at least go and see what Nepal is like.  During his years of study he grew closer to his companions and guides, and therefore closer to God.   Now he can continue to share life with others, a life of thanksgiving for God’s presence in everyone.

I think we are all called to be evangelizers, to bring this law of love alive in ourselves and others.  However we need special prophets as well, people who dedicate their lives to teaching others how to live and teach this law of love.  I look back with thanksgiving at my own childhood in a good Catholic family.  I consider my parents as my first and most important teachers, but not my only teachers.  Dedicated nuns, priests and lay teachers guided me through school and then helped me to respond to the invitation to go to the Jesuit noviciate.  Other guides then took over, leading me to the time of my own final vows and beyond.  Those guides, now my peers and the young men I profess to guide, have become my teachers, my prophets.  The Church and world have changed much in the half century I have been a religious.  There are fewer priests and vowed religious, but not necessarily fewer prophets!  We all are those prophets!  May we help the people in our care learn to revel in God’s love together!

SXC News Release 31 May 2013

A Reason to Celebrate: St. Xavier’s College is 25 years old

 

May 3rd 2013, Kathmandu,

 

An introduction and a brief History of St. Xavier’s college

 

St. Xavier’s school was initially established in Godavari in 1952 after the government of Nepal invited the Jesuit society to open a Jesuit school in Nepal. In 1954, the school in Jwalakhel was opened. The importance and impact of the education delivered by the Jesuit society was clearly evident in the Nepali society. As a result, a need for higher education was felt.  This led to the beginning of college education at St. Xavier’s in Jwalakhel (in 1988) where classes were held in the evenings. In March 1993, King Birendra Bir Bikram Shah inaugurated the new college building in Maitighar and the college was officially moved here from where it has continued to deliver quality higher education. The aim of the college right from the start has been to help create people for others with the spirit to live for God and lead for Nepal.

 

Current activities of St. Xavier’s college and its impact in the Nepali society

 

St. Xavier’s college will be celebrating its silver jubilee throughout the year by organizing different programs and events. The college has contributed significantly in helping build a well educated responsible and creative student body (human resource) as it hasproduced over 10403 graduates from its various faculties.  Currently, the college offers plus two and A-levels programs. While at university level, it offers 13 programs of Bachelor’s and Master’s level that include Social Work, Journalism, Business Studies Microbiology, Physics. It currently has over 3000 students who come from all corners of the country, representing all 75 districts. St. Xavier’s currently has a team of over 200 highly motivated teachers and staff members who continuously strive to ensure that the highest quality of education is delivered.The college practices values in par with the Jesuit tradition of delivering excellent education and service. It was established to foster a passion for excellence and develop competent individuals.  The college also seeks to help students become innovative and not be afraid to take risks; ensure that students do not shy away from challenges and most importantly, create leaders that serve society.The education at St. Xavier’s college has been highly successful till date because it takes an integrative approach where students are not only taught the content matter of their subjects but encouraged to think outside the box. Furthermore the college has fostered competence, confidence, compassion and innovation among students by allowing them to engage in intellectual discussions and in various co curricular activities.  The college has ingrained the value of the importance of service among its students who have become well known for their efforts to help bring about change in society. Students have been recognized for their tireless effort in helping the community through their various books and clothes drives, charity shows (through which they raise money that is often given to help a certain organization), health camps. Furthermore, students from St. Xavier’s College can hold insightful conversations and discussions but yet remain respectful and open minded to hear a new perspective on an issue.

 

Events that will be organized to celebrate the silver jubilee

 

The college plans to celebrate the silver jubilee by organizing programs throughout the year particularly on its annual SET exhibition day, Mela (first of its kind), St. Ignatius Day, and St. Xavier’s Day. On these events there will be various cultural shows and academic seminars. At the same time, it will organize social service activities where different camps and drives will be organized as an effort to further serve the society. The celebration will also be an integral part of the ongoing classes at the college this year where different talk shows, debates and other competitions will be organized for the students to further enrich their learning; while the teachers will be exposed to different workshops and seminars that will help enhance their skills and knowledge about teaching. More importantly, the college plans to introduce new academic programs into the college.

 

The silver jubilee is a celebration of the effectiveness of the college and serves as a further inspiration  to continue working on providing quality education that not only creates thinkers and future leaders but sensible, responsible and thoughtful young adults who have a purpose in life that is to serve society in their own ways and make a difference!

Press Release, St. X. College

A Reason to Celebrate: St. Xavier’s College is 25 years old

May 3rd 2013, Kathmandu,

An introduction and a brief History of St. Xavier’s collegeSt. Xavier’s school was initially established in Godavari in 1952 after the government of Nepal invited the Jesuit society to open a Jesuit school in Nepal. In 1954, the school in Jwalakhel was opened. The importance and impact of the education delivered by the Jesuit society was clearly evident in the Nepali society. As a result, a need for higher education was felt.  This led to the beginning of college education at St. Xavier’s in Jwalakhel (in 1988) where classes were held in the evenings. In March 1993, King Birendra Bir Bikram Shah inaugurated the new college building in Maitighar and the college was officially moved here from where it has continued to deliver quality higher education. The aim of the college right from the start has been to help create people for others with the spirit to live for God and lead for Nepal.

Current activities of St. Xavier’s college and its impact in the Nepali society

St. Xavier’s college will be celebrating its silver jubilee throughout the year by organizing different programs and events. The college has contributed significantly in helping build a well educated responsible and creative student body (human resource) as it has produced over 10403 graduates from its various faculties.  Currently, the college offers plus two and A-levels programs. While at university level, it offers 13 programs of Bachelor’s and Master’s level that include Social Work, Journalism, Business Studies Microbiology, Physics. It currently has over 3000 students who come from all corners of the country, representing all 75 districts. St. Xavier’s currently has a team of over 200 highly motivated teachers and staff members who continuously strive to ensure that the highest quality of education is delivered.
The college practices values in par with the Jesuit tradition of delivering excellent education and service. It was established to foster a passion for excellence and develop competent individuals.  The college also seeks to help students become innovative and not be afraid to take risks; ensure that students do not shy away from challenges and most importantly, create leaders that serve society.
The education at St. Xavier’s college has been highly successful till date because it takes an integrative approach where students are not only taught the content matter of their subjects but encouraged to think outside the box. Furthermore the college has fostered competence, confidence, compassion and innovation among students by allowing them to engage in intellectual discussions and in various co curricular activities.  The college has ingrained the value of the importance of service among its students who have become well known for their efforts to help bring about change in society. Students have been recognized for their tireless effort in helping the community through their various books and clothes drives, charity shows (through which they raise money that is often given to help a certain organization), health camps. Furthermore, students from St. Xavier’s College can hold insightful conversations and discussions but yet remain respectful and open minded to hear a new perspective on an issue.

Events that will be organized to celebrate the silver jubilee

The college plans to celebrate the silver jubilee by organizing programs throughout the year particularly on its annual SET exhibition day, Mela (first of its kind), St. Ignatius Day, and St. Xavier’s Day. On these events there will be various cultural shows and academic seminars. At the same time, it will organize social service activities where different camps and drives will be organized as an effort to further serve the society. The celebration will also be an integral part of the ongoing classes at the college this year where different talk shows, debates and other competitions will be organized for the students to further enrich their learning; while the teachers will be exposed to different workshops and seminars that will help enhance their skills and knowledge about teaching. More importantly, the college plans to introduce new academic programs into the college.

The silver jubilee is a celebration of the effectiveness of the college and serves as a further inspiration  to continue working on providing quality education that not only creates thinkers and future leaders but sensible, responsible and thoughtful young adults who have a purpose in life that is to serve society in their own ways and make a difference!

SLC Results 2069

NEPAL JESUIT SOCIETY

SCHOOL LEAVING CERTIFICATE RESULTS

B.S.2069 (2013)

School./Div.

SX.Jawalakhel

SX.Godavari

SX.Deonia.

MM.Maheshpur

Distinction

46

26

8

0

1st Division

65

47

26

6

2nd Division

2

1

10

15

No Results

3

0

1

7

Total

116

74

45

28

% Passed

97.4

100

97.8

75

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